Carbon Monoxide’s Impact on Indoor Air Quality

Carbon Monoxide’s Impact on Indoor Air Quality

 EPA Archive

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs.

Indoor air pollution “The world’s largest single environmental health risk.”

The WHO calls indoor air pollution “the world’s largest single environmental health risk.”
Indoor air pollution has a wide range of negative health impacts, which can lead to morbidity but also in many cases, mortality. The table features summary data from the World Health Organization (WHO) on the extent of proven links between indoor air pollution and potential health outcomes. These health outcomes range from respiratory infections to chronic obstruction pulmonary disease (COPD) to lung cancer and have….  

What is “good” vs. “bad” ozone?

EPA Archive

Ground-level Ozone Basics

Ozone is a gas composed of three atoms of oxygen. Ozone occurs both in the Earth’s upper atmosphere and at ground level. Ozone can be good or bad, depending on where it is found.

Called stratospheric ozone, good ozone occurs naturally in the upper atmosphere, where it forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. This beneficial ozone has been partially destroyed by manmade chemicals, causing what is sometimes called a “hole in the ozone.” The good news is, this hole is diminishing. Learn more about stratospheric, or “good” ozone.